Solutions

We provide various corporate solutions for organizations. Some of the solutions

 

CRM

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is a widely implemented model for managing an organisation’s interactions with customers, clients, and sales prospects. It involves using technology to organize, automate, and synchronize business processes—principally sales activities, but also those for marketing, customer service, and technical support. The overall goals are to find, attract, and win new clients; nurture and retain those the company already has; entice former clients back into the fold; and reduce the costs of marketing and client service. Customer relationship management describes a company-wide business strategy including customer-interface departments as well as other departments. Measuring and valuing customer relationships is critical to implementing this strategy.



Intranet

An intranet is a computer network that uses Internet Protocol technology to share information, operational systems, or computing services within an organization. The term is used in contrast to internet, a network between organizations, and instead refers to a network within an organization. Sometimes, the term refers only to the organization's internal website, but may be a more extensive part of the organization's information technology infrastructure, and may be composed of multiple local area networks. An intranet may host multiple private websites and constitute an important component and focal point of internal communication and collaboration. Any of the well known Internet protocols may be found in an intranet, such as HTTP (web services), SMTP (e-mail), and FTP (file transfer protocol). Internet technologies are often deployed to provide modern interfaces to legacy information systems hosting corporate data.



Issue Management

An issue in a project represents a question or decision that is important to one or more stakeholders and should be addressed by the project team as part of the project execution. That’s a pretty broad definition, and has several different facets: An issue does not have to be answered or resolved. In fact, many issues can be documented, with or without resolution. Some can be passed on to a future project, or left for another initiative An issue must pass some “importance hurdle” to some stakeholder. This obviously is pretty subjective, and is in the eye of the beholder, but someone must think the issue is at least worth documenting Addressed can mean just documenting the issue, and leaving it unresolved. This can happen at both ends of the scale – the trivial need not be resolved, and may truly important issues can’t be resolved by the project team Addressed can mean capturing a decision about an issue, even if the decision is not to deal with an issue within the scope of the project.



Office Anywhere

A virtual office is a combination of off-site live communication and address services that allow users to reduce traditional office costs while maintaining business professionalism. Frequently the term is confused with “office business centers” or “executive suites” which demand a conventional lease whereas a true virtual office does not require that expense. The virtual office idea came from the convergence of technological innovation and the Information Age. The concept has roots in the Industrial Revolution, where parallels to current work styles, specifically working from home, have been drawn. The term was first used in a 1983 airline in-flight magazine article about portable computing. The virtual office concept is an evolution of the executive suites industry. However, the inflexibility of an executive suite lease doesn’t work for many business models and helped spur the virtual office concept. The first commercial application of a virtual office occurred in 1994, when Ralph Gregory founded “The Virtual Office, Inc”, in Boulder, Colorado. This company expanded throughout North America and is now known as "Intelligent Office”.



Corporate Identity

Corporate identity comes into being when there is a common ownership of an organizational philosophy that is manifest in a distinct corporate culture — the corporate personality. At its most profound, the public feel that they have ownership of the philosophy. Often referred to as organizational identity, corporate identity helps organizations to answer questions like “who are we?” and “where are we going?” Corporate identity also allows consumers to denote their sense of belonging with particular human aggregates or groups. In general, this amounts to a corporate title, logo (logotype and/or logogram), and supporting devices commonly assembled within a set of guidelines. These guidelines govern how the identity is applied and confirm approved colour palettes, typefaces, page layouts and other such methods of maintaining visual continuity and brand recognition across all physical manifestations of the brand. These guidelines are usually formulated into a package of tools called corporate identity manuals. Many companies, such as McDonald's and Electronic Arts, have their own identity that runs through all of their products and merchandise. The trademark "M" logo and the yellow and red appears consistently throughout the McDonald's packaging and advertisements. Many companies pay large amounts of money for the research, design and execution involved in creating an identity that is extremely distinguishable and appealing to the company's target audience.



Business Vitualization

A virtual business employs electronic means to transact business as opposed to a traditional brick and mortar business that relies on face-to-face transactions with physical documents and physical currency or credit. Most brick and mortar companies reduce costs and increase market share by engaging in e-commerce via web sites and by leveraging their existing telecommunications infrastructure. In addition to sales and customer relations, such e-commerce may also include: Collaborating with suppliers and competitors. Outsourcing many of the business functions like marketing, operations management and new product development, Some virtual businesses operate solely in a virtual world. Environments such as Second Life have enough economical activity to be viable for commerce and one can make a living from sales of virtual property, products and services to virtual customers in these virtual worlds.In the USA groups of people can assemble online and enter into an agreement to work together toward a for-profit goal, with or without having to formally incorporate or form a traditional company. A virtual corporation (S-corp or LLC) may be required to maintain a registered agent with a physical address but it can be started, operated and terminated without any of the principals ever being in each others' physical presence.